Wednesday, May 28, 2014

Remembering Maya Angelou

so sad to hear the news about Maya Angelou today. i learned so much from reading her entire collection of (7? 8?) memoirs one autumn, about alternate perspectives and the value of all our stories. i was so proud to learn that an article i wrote that casually mentioned her work in passing that was hit by trolls inspired a lively two-day class discussion about her work and mine in which high schoolers who usually never speak spoke up. a lot. from 2010. #weneeddiversebooks 

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

"Where the Lava Meets the Sea" in "Kimchi for Life."

Wow, looks great! So pleased to be a part of the A Melting Pot of Thoughts series once again, with "Where the Lava Meets the Sea" in the new book, "Kimchi for Life." Check out this sweet love letter from the editor, Ahn Mai Xuan Bui:
Dear Frances, I'd like to thank you for being a great friend of A Melting Pot of Thoughts. Your leadership in the field of Asian literature is well recognized and appreciated.

Monday, May 26, 2014

the intersections of family stories and history on Memorial Day

Remembering my maternal grandfather this Memorial Day, who was a fighter pilot with Chennault’s Flying Tigers during WW2, who took a train across the American South in 1945 to train in Texas for a year (with Connie Chung's dad!), who flew the last plane out of China in 1949... Thanks to all our vets as we think about the intersections of family stories and history in "Grandfather Walking" on page 109 of Kartika Review http://issuu.com/kartikareview/docs/kartika_issue16



Saturday, May 24, 2014

Thursday, May 22, 2014

Speaking today for AAPI Heritage Month

And that's it for APA/AAPI Heritage Month for me. Broadcast to US military worldwide, they told me afterwards. With shoutouts to "Fresh off the Boat" and Corky Lee's new Transcontinental Railroad photograph, although they said they'd have to bleep out my calling Tammy Duckworth "totally badass." oops. Even though she is. (Go Google "Tammy Duckworth eviscerates contractor" and smile).

Saturday, May 17, 2014

EATING CULTURES: Literary Sriracha - A Spicy Mix of Poetry, Mini-Memoirs, and Flash Fiction

"Poignant Truth, Precarious You (and preparing for the Sriracha Apocalypse)" at EATING CULTURES: Literary Sriracha - A Spicy Mix of Poetry, Mini-Memoirs, and Flash Fiction with the great folks at Asian American Women Artists Association at SOMArts Gallery. Thanks for a great event! Thanks May-lee Chai for curating such a great reading! Thanks Michelle Lee for curating such a thought provoking art exhibition. So pleased to be a part.Thanks HoChie Tsai and Grace Hwang Lynch and Reiko Fujii for the great photographs!









Friday, May 16, 2014

AAWAA Eating Cultures final day May 31


from Asian American Women's Artists Association (Must be May 31, 2014):

"Join us in celebrating the final day of EATING CULTURES with a Community Potluck co-hosted by Community Health for Asian Americans. Bring a special dish to share and a personal recipe for our community recipe wall!

SPECIAL PERFORMANCE | Genevieve Erin O'Brien in “Sausage Homage”.

GALLERY HOURS | May 1-30, 2014. Tuesday through Friday from 12-7pm, and Saturdays from 12-5pm.

CURATOR | Michelle Lee
CURATORIAL ADVISORS | Linda Inson Choy & Cynthia Tom

JUROR | Dr. Margo L. Machida, Professor of Art History & Asian American Studies at the University of Connecticut

FEATURED ARTISTS | Susan Almazol • Sigi Arnejo • Jung Ran Bae • Mitsuko Brooks • Ka Yan Cheung • Karen Chew • Flora Choi • Melissa Chow • Samantha Chundur • Kay Cuajunco • Alison Ho • Grace Jahng Lee • Zilka Joseph • Juliana Kang Robinson • Larry Lee & Jason Dunda • Theresa Loong • Alana Lowe • **Cathy Lu • Mieko Meguro • Michiko Murakami • Chee Wang Ng • **Genevieve Erin O'Brien with Aaron Henderson & Grace Umali • Jessica Redmond • Margaret Rhee • **kate hers RHEE • Yoshie Sakai • Shizue Seigel • Pallavi Sharma • Jessica Tang • Cynthia Tom • Christine Toy Johnson • Frances Kai-Hwa Wang • Michael Watson • Maggie Wong • Leslie Zeitler • Sara Zin

ABOUT THE EXHIBITION| AAWAA and Asian Pacific Islander Cultural Center (APICC) join forces to present the multidisciplinary art exhibition Eating Cultures, for the United States of Asian America Festival throughout May 2014. Featuring over thirty emerging and established Asian Pacific American artists from around the country, Eating Cultures is a deliciously provocative multi-disciplinary arts exhibition of artworks inspired by Asian American food and foodways. Using food as a lens, artist share stories of global migration, adaptation, entrepreneurship, and the central importance of food in Asian communities around the world.

In addition to over fifty art, film, and literary works, Eating Cultures will feature Asian American oral histories provided by Southern Foodways Alliance via Guide by Cell, dynamic programming co-presented by Asia Society and the Culinary Historians of Northern California, a pop-up shop, and a recipe wall for audiences to share their favorite family recipes.

INVITED ARTISTS|
Cathy Lu • http://www.cathyclu.com/
Cathy Lu is a Chinese American San Francisco based painter and sculptor. Using traditional Chinese iconography and symbolism as jumping off point, Lu explores ideas of gender, cultural identity and global patterns of migration. She received her MFA from the San Francisco Art Institute. Her work has been exhibited nationally and internationally, including at the Jingdezhen Contemporary International Ceramic Exhibition in China.

Genevieve Erin O'Brien • http://www.erin-obrien.com/
Genevieve Erin O’Brien is a Queer Vietnamese-Irish American Los Angeles based artist, community organizer, and educator. She received her MFA in Studio Art/Performance from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. In 2009 she received a Fulbright Fellowship to travel to Vietnam to conduct research for her Nu’ó’c Nào? project. She has presented work nationally and internationally, including at at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago.

kate hers RHEE • http://www.estherka.com/
Kate Hers Rhee is a Korean American Berlin and Detroit based visual artist and cultural producer who works in the field of social art practice. Her work seeks to rethink and reshape notions of transnational and cultural identity, often through different modes of communication and public/private interventions. She received her MFA from the University of California at Irvine. Her work Dr. Rhee’s Kimtschi Shop has been shown internationally and featured on PRI’s “The World”.

ABOUT AAWAA | Asian American Women Artists Association (AAWAA) is a national non-profit arts organization dedicated to ensuring the visibility and documentation of Asian Pacific American women in the arts. Since 1989, AAWAA has been a resource for the arts and academic communities, working to further the recognition of Asian American women artists. Through exhibitions, literary readings, speakers' bureau, publications, and educational programs, AAWAA offers thought-provoking perspectives that challenge societal assumptions and promote dialogue across cultures and generations. For more information on AAWAA and its mission and programs, please visit www.aawaa.net.

ABOUT APICC | This program is co-presented by API Cultural Center- San Francisco (APICC) mission is to support and produce multi-disciplinary art reflective of the unique experiences of Asian Pacific Islanders living in the United States. Since 1998, the Center has promoted the artistic and organizational growth of the City’s Asian/Pacific arts community by organizing and presenting the annual United States of Asian America Festival. For more information on APICC and its mission and programs, please visitwww.apiculturalcenter.org.

ALL ADMISSION TO EATING CULTURES EVENTS AND PROGRAMS ARE FREE TO THE PUBLIC."

Thursday, May 15, 2014

arborweb.com TechTwilight - Ann Arbor Observer

My memories of the Ann Arbor Hands-On Museum begin in the old museum's preschool room, with my toddlers crawling on and around the big red fire truck, trying on different firefighter coats, and cooking up strange concoctions in the play kitchen. But as the children have grown up, so has the way we love our museum.
TechTwilight is an evening of nerdlicious fun for all ages featuring more than thirty local tech companies and nonprofits showing off their latest innovations and interactive technologies, sharing their excitement about science and technology with the community, and fundraising to support the Ann Arbor Hands-On Museum and its mission to educate young people about science, technology, engineering, art, and math.

Click here for whole article: arborweb.com TechTwilight - Ann Arbor Observer

Wednesday, May 14, 2014

Official list of readers for EATING CULTURES Literary Sriracha

Photo: Check out the official list of readers for Saturday's EATING CULTURES: Literary Sriracha - A Spicy Mix of Poetry, Mini-Memoirs, and Flash Fiction!

WINBERG CHAI is the author of more than twenty books on Asia and co-author, most recently, of a family memoir, The Girl from Purple Mountain as well as China A to Z. Born in Shanghai, he immigrated to the United States after World War II in 1950. He is a professor emeritus of political science from the University of Wyoming.

QINGMEI CHEN is a practicing acupuncturist. Born in Guangdong Province, she immigrated with her family to San Francisco when she was seven. She has a BA in Psychology from UC-Santa Cruz and a Master’s in Traditional Chinese Medicine from the American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine. She is currently at work on a novel.

GWYNN GACOSTA has a B.A. in political science from UC-Berkeley and an M.A. in English-Creative Writing from San Francisco State University. She works as a Special Education para educator for the Fairfield-Suisun Unified School District, as well as a tutor for Sylvan Learning Center's after-school literacy program. She is the mother of two boys. She writes frequently about the Filipino Diaspora.

GEORGE LEW has studied at Amherst College and Peking University. A native of San Francisco’s Chinatown, he has traveled worldwide and speaks five languages. He is currently working on a research project on the all-too-often overlooked Maritime Silk Road. In his spare time, George enjoys used bookstores, horticulture, and rare hand-woven textiles from around the world.

SHIZUE SEIGEL is a third-generation Japanese American who explores history, place and spirituality through visual art, prose and poetry. She was chief cartographer for “Unfathomable City: A New Orleans Atlas” and recently spoke at the National World War II Museum about her book In Good Conscience: Supporting Japanese American during the Internment .

DEBANTI SENGUPTA is a scientist by training. She received a Bachelor’s Degree from Amherst College, and a PhD in Chemistry from Stanford. She has also lived on three different continents, and has been nourished by Indian achaars, African piri piri, Thai nam prik pao, and American hot sauce. 

FRANCES KAI-HWA WANG is a second-generation Chinese American from California who now divides her time between Michigan and Hawai'i. She writes for ethnic new media, teaches Asian/Pacific Islander American Studies at University of Michigan, has published three chapbooks of prose poetry, and she will have a multimedia artwork with Jyoti Omi Chowdhury entitled, “Dreams of the Diaspora,” as part of a Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center Indian American Heritage Project online and traveling art exhibition. Check out franceskaihwawang.com.

Photo of Shizue Seigel's My Mother and Betty Crocker, courtesy of Cris Matos.

#IAmBeyond

Looking forward to meeting all these good folks! Check out the official list of readers for Saturday's EATING CULTURES: Literary Sriracha - A Spicy Mix of Poetry, Mini-Memoirs, and Flash Fiction!

WINBERG CHAI is the author of more than twenty books on Asia and co-author, most recently, of a family memoir, The Girl from Purple Mountain as well as China A to Z. Born in Shanghai, he immigrated to the United States after World War II in 1950. He is a professor emeritus of political science from the University of Wyoming.

QINGMEI CHEN is a practicing acupuncturist. Born in Guangdong Province, she immigrated with her family to San Francisco when she was seven. She has a BA in Psychology from UC-Santa Cruz and a Master’s in Traditional Chinese Medicine from the American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine. She is currently at work on a novel.

GWYNN GACOSTA has a B.A. in political science from UC-Berkeley and an M.A. in English-Creative Writing from San Francisco State University. She works as a Special Education para educator for the Fairfield-Suisun Unified School District, as well as a tutor for Sylvan Learning Center's after-school literacy program. She is the mother of two boys. She writes frequently about the Filipino Diaspora.

GEORGE LEW has studied at Amherst College and Peking University. A native of San Francisco’s Chinatown, he has traveled worldwide and speaks five languages. He is currently working on a research project on the all-too-often overlooked Maritime Silk Road. In his spare time, George enjoys used bookstores, horticulture, and rare hand-woven textiles from around the world.

SHIZUE SEIGEL is a third-generation Japanese American who explores history, place and spirituality through visual art, prose and poetry. She was chief cartographer for “Unfathomable City: A New Orleans Atlas” and recently spoke at the National World War II Museum about her book In Good Conscience: Supporting Japanese American during the Internment .

DEBANTI SENGUPTA is a scientist by training. She received a Bachelor’s Degree from Amherst College, and a PhD in Chemistry from Stanford. She has also lived on three different continents, and has been nourished by Indian achaars, African piri piri, Thai nam prik pao, and American hot sauce.

FRANCES KAI-HWA WANG is a second-generation Chinese American from California who now divides her time between Michigan and Hawai'i. She writes for ethnic new media, teaches Asian/Pacific Islander American Studies at University of Michigan, has published three chapbooks of prose poetry, and she will have a multimedia artwork with Jyoti Omi Chowdhury entitled, “Dreams of the Diaspora,” as part of a Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center Indian American Heritage Project online and traveling art exhibition. Check out franceskaihwawang.com.

Photo of Shizue Seigel's My Mother and Betty Crocker, courtesy of Cris Matos.

Saturday, May 10, 2014

#LifeAPA: A Day in the Life of Asian Pacific America | Flickr Blog

So much fun to be a part of the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center A Day in the Life of Asian Pacific America #LifeAPA today! We took photos on the soccer field, at an APA Heritage Month and Taiwanese American Heritage Week event, and getting Korean fried chicken at Seoul Street! Now kids are studying for AP Exams. Can't get more APA Heritage month than that!

#LifeAPA: A Day in the Life of Asian Pacific America | Flickr Blog

Storytelling today at Bookbound with FASCA

The students of FASCA will be joining me today with crafts and storytelling! (and maybe Chinese Yo-Yo too). Happy Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, Taiwanese American Heritage Week, and Children's Book Week! Stories on Saturday, May 10, 2014, 2:00 pm, Bookbound, 1729 Plymouth Road, Ann Arbor.

Friday, May 9, 2014

Did you eat? means…I love you. | AAPI Voices

Did you eat? means…I love you.

Thank you AAPI Voices for including my poem, “Did you eat? means…I love you,” and Hao Hao's photographs in today's Art Friday! Inspired by Ryan Suda Blacklava and originally published in Kartika Review and currently on exhibit at Asian American Women Artists Association EATING CULTURES in SF, I am so pleased to be a part of this hot new data journalism project with Karthick Ramakrishnan CM Samala et al. Aren't I so cute in this picture?http://aapivoices.com/did-you-eat-meansi-love-you/

Did you eat? means…I love you.

And you know y'all want the T-shirt

Thursday, May 8, 2014

Did you eat means I Love You T Shirt by Blacklava

Alternate image

Just got word that my prose poem, "Did you eat? means...I Love You," inspired by the Blacklava T-shirt of the same name (and originally published in Kartika Review) will be published this Friday at the hot new AAPIData journalism project, AAPIVoices, for Art Friday! Do you have this T-shirt? Get one for your mom for mother's day! They have buttons too!

Did you eat means I Love You T Shirt by Blacklava

Wednesday, May 7, 2014

Eating Cultures: A Deliciously Provocative Art Exhibition

cathylu4

Thanks Angry Asian Man for the plug! I'm so pleased to be a part of this Asian American Women Artists Association art exhibition and reading!
Eating Cultures: A Deliciously Provocative Art Exhibition

And I just finished writing my poem! “Poignant Truth, Precarious You (and preparing for the Sriracha Apocalypse)” based on this artwork, “Poignant Truth”:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/aawaa_sf/13442122693/in/set-72157642991346933/

So, California friends, don't forget to come to Literary Sriracha on Saturday May 17 2-4 pm at SOMArts in The City!
EATING CULTURES: Literary Sriracha - A Spicy Mix of Poetry, Mini-Memoirs, and Flash Fiction

Here's the first love letter from the exhibition so far...
"I was visiting my friend...at the opening reception for Eating Cultures at SOMArts (what a mouthful!) when I saw your piece up on the far wall. I loved it, and I stood there staring at your name trying to figure out how I knew you!"

I can't wait to see it!

Tuesday, May 6, 2014

Race integral part of Vincent Chin case | The Detroit News

Per American Citizens for Justice: "The Detroit News agreed to have a rebuttal article following Neal Rubin's article after discussions with AAJA National, and invited Frank Wu to write an article. Here it is in today's Detroit News."

Race integral part of Vincent Chin case | The Detroit News

Monday, May 5, 2014

"Skipping Hopscotch Atop Hyphens" published in Ricepaper Magazine Spring 2014

Look what came in the mail from Ricepaper! Check out the "Genuine Canadian Magazine" mark! Love the "Asian/Canadian/Curious." And there is just something about paper... love everything about the cover (by Kalsang Dawa), including the texture and weight.

Purchase yours here!
http://ricepapermagazine.ca/2014/03/spring-2014-18-4-issue/


Sunday, May 4, 2014

Bookbound on #WeNeedDiverseBooks

From my friend Megan Blackshear at Bookbound Bookstore in AnnArbor Michigan. You can reach them at www.bookboundbookstore.com and www.facebook.com/bookboundbookstore:


#WeNeedDiverseBooks

Over the last few weeks, there has been some controversy about the lack of diversity in the book world, from the skin color of characters in children's books to the authors represented at major industry events. Discussions have been sparked on Facebook, Twitter and the blogosphere in recent days. We believe this is a very important conversation to have, although we've struggled with trying to fit our thoughts into a 140 character tweet.

We need diverse books because otherwise we wouldn't be doing our job as a community bookstore. Simply put, we are in a very diverse neighborhood and we want our books to reflect our customers' varied interests. We want everyone to feel comfortable and welcome in our store.

Many people read to feel connected - to a character, an idea, an emotion, an identity - and to know they are not alone. Too many folks are marginalized and underrepresented, are struggling with identity, or just 'feel different'. Knowing that someone else, somewhere, sometime, felt this way too and managed to survive and thrive can make a real difference in one's life.

Books are a vital source of education and information. We can learn about people and places that are different from ourselves in terms of nationality, race, class, religion, gender orientation, sexual preference, and overall life experience. We can read about ideas that challenge the mainstream. Books give us a chance to walk a mile in someone else's shoes if we are open to it. They allow us to relate to 'the other', and to realize we may have more in common than we thought. Perhaps they can help us navigate this world with curiosity and appreciation for diversity rather than fear of the unknown.  

Books can have a profound impact. They matter. We need diverse books.

Further reading:




Saturday, May 3, 2014

InCultureParent | Why Diversity in Children’s Books Matters

thanks to InCultureParent.com for bringing back an article I wrote just in time for #weneeddiversebooks
I recently received an e-mail from a Caucasian reader in Pennsylvania whose gifted seven-year-old daughter would rather be normal than smart. We think we have come such a long way; her father struggles to convince her that there are lots of other smart kids around the world who do well in math, yet this seven-year-old girl already knows.

The ache to be normal does not necessarily follow lines of color or culture or class.

Books are one way to expand the definition of normal beyond that presented in the mainstream. Through books, we can peer into another world, appreciate another point of view, find resonance where we did not expect it.
InCultureParent | Why Diversity in Children’s Books Matters

btw, today is the last day of the #WeNeedDiverseBooks virtual campaign going on may 1-3 on Twitter and other digital spaces that was triggered when
"BEA’s Bookcon recently announced an all-white-male panel of “luminaries of children’s literature,” and when we pointed out the lack of diversity, nothing changed..."
https://www.facebook.com/events/745853242132100/

Roundup of responses to Neal Rubin's terrible article in Detroit News dissing Vincent Chin case

I've been keeping a roundup of responses to Neal Rubin's terrible article in Detroit News trying to rewrite the Vincent Chin case over at RememberingVincentChin.com, so please go there for more up to date information or for a chronological record of the responses. Here is a summary, with the best articles on top.

Truly beautiful analysis and convo from the great Jeff Yang with quotes from Helen Zia, Renee Tajima-Peña Curtis Chin and Neal Rubin too about Neal Rubin Detroit News article in context of larger issue of Bundy and Sterling and wishing racism would just go away already.
Pretending racism doesn’t exist won’t make it go away - Quartz

Powerful statement from Stewart Kwoh at Asian Americans Advancing Justice LA:
Detroit News Columnist Trivializes Vincent Chin's Murder and Its Legacy | Asian Americans Advancing Justice - LA

Frank Wu's excellent response against Neal Rubin's aggravating revisionist history in Detroit News. Get all your facts straight here:
The Case Against Vincent Chin | Frank H. Wu

From Jenn Fang at Reappropriate, updated with images of the almost original article vs what it says now (several changes were made after the original time of publication at April 29 1:03 am ish without any editorial note about the updates--bad journalistic practice).
Reporter blames Vincent Chin for his own murder? | @nealrubin_dn | Reappropriate

Yes! The Asian American Journalists Association holding the Detroit News to journalistic standards.
Asian American Journalists Association – AAJA seeks retraction from The Detroit News for Neal Rubin’s column revisiting the Vincent Chin murder case

From Emil Guillermo on the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund (AALDEF) blog re that Neal Rubin article in The Detroit News...
Blog: Happy Asian American Pacific Islander Month...and BTW, the race aspects of the murder of Vincent Chin are no urban myth - AALDEF

From the Michigan Asian Pacific American Affairs Commission Chair Jamie Hsu on the Vincent Chin Murder Case

from Julianne Hing in Colorlines on Neal Rubin's article in Detroit News:
Detroit News Columnist Rewrites History of Vincent Chin Hate Crime - COLORLINES

And here is my initial respose:

Hey Neal Rubin, According to the juror interviewed in the Academy Award winning documentary, "Who Killed Vincent Chin?" the jurors in Detroit federal trial found Ms. Racine Colwell to be THE most credible witness in the whole trial. You also forgot about the part where Ebens and Nitz paid Jimmy Perry $20 to help them hunt down "the Chinaman," before finally finding him at the McDonald's. Yes, Ronald Ebens was employed at Chrysler at the time (and Nitz had recently been laid off)--that was one of the reasons cited by Judge Kaufmann for the lenient sentence, that having a job gives one license to kill--but that does not mean that this case still was not all about race. Rather than relying on random third-hand information for a convoluted argument, you should do some research before launching your revisionist history and irresponsible journalism. The Michigan State Bar has deemed this case a Michigan Legal Milestone. You should talk to them.
--Frances Kai-Hwa Wang

Here is Neal Rubin's terrible article in The Detroit News (Note: the content has been changed several times since first publication April 29, 2014, 1:03 am ish without any editor's notes regarding the updates):
What we all assume we know about the Vincent Chin case probably isn't so | The Detroit News

And here is the almost as terrible article by Charlie LeDuff in the New York Times that started it all with a careless offhand comment re the Vincent Chin case:
A Beating in Detroit - NYTimes.com


UPDATED with two new articles:

Frank Wu response in Detroit News
Race integral part of Vincent Chin case | The Detroit News

UNITY Statement from David Steinberg, the UNITY president, on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/aajamain/permalink/10152457570541474/

Friday, May 2, 2014

Frances Storytelling at Bookbound for APA Heritage Month

Happy Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, Taiwanese American Heritage Week, and Children's Book Week! Stories on Saturday, May 10, 2014, 2:00 pm, Bookbound, 1729 Plymouth Road, Ann Arbor.

Speaking of stories, you should also check out the #WeNeedDiverseBooks virtual campaign going on may 1-3 on Twitter and other digital spaces.
"BEA’s Bookcon recently announced an all-white-male panel of “luminaries of children’s literature,” and when we pointed out the lack of diversity, nothing changed..."

Thursday, May 1, 2014

Eating Cultures | Asian American Women Artists Association



Congratulations to the Asian American Women's Artists Association on their opening today of the EATING CULTURES Art Exhibition, May 1-30, SomARTS, San Francisco. My mixed media piece, "Did you eat? means...I love you," is included in the exhibition and my chapbooks are for sale at all associated events. Can't wait to see it! The full schedule is here:

Eating Cultures | Asian American Women Artists Association

And I will be reading Saturday, May 17, 2014, 2:00-4:00 pm:

EATING CULTURES: Literary Sriracha - A Spicy Mix of Poetry, Mini-Memoirs, and Flash Fiction

Are We One, or Many? | AAPI Voices

Are We One, or Many?

Happy Asian Pacific American Heritage Month! I'm so pleased to be a part of AAPI Voices, a new project of AAPI Data and 18 Million Rising, bringing data journalism to the task of amplifying the voices of Asian Pacific America! And I am especially excited to be writing alongside some great folks like Karthick Ramakrishnan, CM Samala, Keith Chow, Jeff Yang.

Check out Jeff Yang's article launching AAPI Voices for APA Heritage Month!

Are We One, or Many?

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