Saturday, December 31, 2011

How to Raise Strong and Confident Asian Pacific American Daughters | InCultureParent

Thanks to InCultureParent.com for featuring this article!

A few years ago, I took a seminar called, “Raising Strong and Confident Daughters.” My husband laughed at me. “Could our daughters be any stronger or more confident?”

The class was an eye-opener for me, not just in how to raise my girls, but also in understanding my own Chinese-American childhood. I had no memory of dealing with a lot of the issues the instructor talked about as being so important to pre-adolescent girls, such as friendship and physical appearance.

click on link for more: How to Raise Strong and Confident Asian Pacific American Daughters | InCultureParent

Friday, December 23, 2011

Learning about Christmas and Santa through the claymation classics-Adventures in Multicultural Living - NAM EthnoBlog

Asian American journalist Lisa Ling once said onThe View that as a child she thought Santa liked Caucasian children better than Chinese children because he always left much better and bigger gifts, like stereos, for her Caucasian friends, whereas he only left small gifts, like batteries and toothbrushes, in her stocking. When I heard that, it was as if I was hearing silver bells. I always got batteries and toothbrushes in my stocking, too. I had grown up thinking that gifts from Santa always had to be small in order to fit inside the stocking.

It was not until I was in my 30’s that I discovered that some people received gifts from Santa that not only spilled out of their stockings, but covered the floor and piled up as high as the Christmas tree. Some people did not even bother hanging up stockings by the chimney with care, as they knew their gifts would be bigger than that. Is that allowed?

click on link for more: Learning about Christmas and Santa through the claymation classics-Adventures in Multicultural Living - NAM EthnoBlog

Monday, December 5, 2011

Adventures in Multicultural Living: Racism in the Extended Family on the Holidays | InCultureParent

The Sunday after Thanksgiving: The day we pack up, gratefully drive back to our own home in our own town with our own way of doing things, and are stuck in the car together for hours and have no choice but to talk to each other. It is a time to reflect on the (peculiar) people we met and the (wacky) things that happened, and it is a chance to talk to the kids about what is really important to us as a family. I call it the post-holiday debriefing (and I recommend this in my Multicultural Toolbox workshops as one strategy for combating racism and intolerance in the extended family).

click on link for more: Racism in the Extended Family on the Holidays | InCultureParent
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