Wednesday, August 31, 2011

Chicago is the World » Showing off our many local treasures, the power of sharing our ideas | Adventures in Multicultural Living

The Asian American Journalists Association (AAJA) National Convention was held in Detroit this month. I really wanted to attend, since it was home, but unfortunately I was not able to make it. Still, I watched from afar via Twitter, I saw my friends smiling in Twitpix, I connected people to each other via Facebook and email, I read newspaper articles online, and I even received a cellphone call that would have allowed me to listen in on one of the panels (if only I had not been driving at the time). It was a little surreal seeing a photograph in the Detroit Free Press of my real-life friends together with my virtual friends, not to mention hearing about the conversations they had because of my virtual introductions.

click on link for more: Chicago is the World » Showing off our many local treasures, the power of sharing our ideas | Adventures in Multicultural Living

Monday, August 29, 2011

AML: Showing off our many local treasures, the power of sharing our ideas - NAM EthnoBlog

The Asian American Journalists Association (AAJA) National Convention was held in Detroit this month. I really wanted to attend, since it was home, but unfortunately I was not able to make it. Still, I watched from afar via Twitter, I saw my friends smiling in Twitpix, I connected people to each other via Facebook and email, I read newspaper articles online, and I even received a cellphone call that would have allowed me to listen in on one of the panels (if only I had not been driving at the time).

It was a little surreal seeing a photograph in the Detroit Free Press of my real-life friends together with my virtual friends, not to mention hearing about the conversations they had because of my virtual introductions.

click on link for more: Showing off our many local treasures, the power of sharing our ideas - NAM EthnoBlog

Sunday, August 28, 2011

AML: Showing off our many local treasures, the power of sharing our ideas | annarbor.com

The Asian American Journalists Association (AAJA) National Convention was held in Detroit this month. I really wanted to attend, since it was home, but unfortunately I was not able to make it. Still, I watched from afar via Twitter, I saw my friends smiling in Twitpix, I connected people to each other via Facebook and email, I read newspaper articles online, and I even received a cellphone call that would have allowed me to listen in on one of the panels (if only I had not been driving at the time).

It was a little surreal seeing a photograph in the Detroit Free Press of my real-life friends together with my virtual friends, not to mention hearing about the conversations they had because of my virtual introductions.

click on link for more: Showing off our many local treasures, the power of sharing our ideas

Sunday, August 21, 2011

Adventures in Multicultural Living: From Band Camp to Ramadan - finding strength, skinniness and similarities | annarbor.com

t the annual Band Camp concert at Interlochen a few years ago, my friend Shih-yi joked, “This would be a good day to rob Ann Arbor. Half the town is here.”

After a summer of family time, it is quite the plunge back into the cold refreshing waters of school life up at Interlochen where (some configuration of) the Huron, Pioneer and Skyline bands, orchestras, and choirs perform every year after a week of band/orchestra/choir camp — not only for the children who are summoned by the bugle call at 6:30 every morning, but also for the parents and siblings who have not seen all the other parents and siblings all summer.

The Huron Music Association has a bus for folks to ride up to Interlochen so that we do not all have to drive, but I sort of like the drive. I load up Ella Fitzgerald and Frank Sinatra songs in my CD player or iPod and I sing at the top of my lungs for four hours up and four hours back.

Driving long distances alone makes me nervous (I am always — justifiably — worried that my car is not going to make it), but once I manage to make it there and back successfully, I find that I am recharged, revitalized, renewed.

There is something about going someplace new to see things from a new perspective.

click on link for more: From Band Camp to Ramadan - finding strength, skinniness and similarities

Monday, August 15, 2011

AML Finally finding time for church/temple in the space of summer - NAM EthnoBlog

A girlfriend who attends St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church once told me how invaluable that one hour a week every Sunday morning was for her, to sit, reflect, pray, and be alone. To hear her describe it, I wanted to go, too.

(I remember when my children were babies, the only time I was ever alone was three precious minutes a day in the shower — only the first half of the shower, mind you — before they invariably poked their heads in looking for me again.)

However, during the school year, I often find that temple is simply one thing too many for me to manage. During the school year, the children and I are so exhausted all the time, the roads are so long, the snow is so deep — that we never quite make it all the way across town to temple.

click on link for more: Finally finding time for church/temple in the space of summer - NAM EthnoBlog

Sunday, August 14, 2011

Adventures in Multicultural Living: Finally finding time for church/temple in the space of summer | annarbor.com

A girlfriend who attends St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church once told me how invaluable that one hour a week every Sunday morning was for her, to sit, reflect, pray, and be alone.

To hear her describe it, I wanted to go, too.

(I remember when my children were babies, the only time I was ever alone was three precious minutes a day in the shower — only the first half of the shower, mind you — before they invariably poked their heads in looking for me again.)

However, during the school year, I often find that temple is simply one thing too many for me to manage. During the school year, the children and I are so exhausted all the time, the roads are so long, the snow is so deep — that we never quite make it all the way across town to temple.

I know, I know, if I were a better person, I would find time to do it year-round like normal people. If it were higher on my priority list, I would make time for it like everyone else. Going to temple only once or twice year on holy days only (and late at that) is flimsy, tenuous, lame.

click on link for more: Finally finding time for church/temple in the space of summer

Friday, August 12, 2011

American Citizens for Justice: What people are saing at AAJA – Detroit, Michigan

The Asian American Journalists Association Convention takes place this week in Detroit. Here's what people are saying about the Vincent Chin case:

American Citizens for Justice: What people are saing at AAJA – Detroit, Michigan

AAJA, Detroit remember Vincent Chin « AAJA Voices 2011 – Detroit, Michigan

check out this picture of the panel from JozJozJoz Wang http://twitpic.com/64kscc

check out this picture of Helen Zia from Betty Ming Liu http://twitpic.com/64h3il

and here are some interesting resources about the Vincent Chin case from June: American Citizens for Justice: On the 29th anniversary of the murder of Vincent Chin

Wednesday, August 10, 2011

Rhythms of the Season | InCultureParent

After a long trip away from home, one of the first things I always do upon our return is take all the kids to buy groceries at our favorite Chinese grocery store. I love watching them zip around, squealing as they load up our basket, “Ooooh! It’s been so long since we’ve had cong you bing!” “Xiao long bao! I want xiao long bao!” and “I haven’t seen this kind of zhu rou gan in soooooo long!”

At Tsai Grocery, the kids and I all know what and where everything is. There is none of the uncertainty that comes with travel and being in new and unfamiliar environs. Our tested and favorite brands are there where they always are. We recall our favorite dishes that we have missed all summer. We find comfort and grounding here among the steamed buns. We have not really come home until we replenish our pantry and cook our first meal together.

click here for more: Rhythms of the Season | InCultureParent

Tuesday, August 9, 2011

Chicago is the World » Thinking of peace at the Buddhist Toro Nagashi after the terrorist attack in Norway

Two weeks after the Obon Festival, a Buddhist holiday to remember and celebrate one’s ancestors, during which spirits are said to come home to visit the family for two weeks, comes the Toro Nagashi, a Buddhist ritual to send our visiting ancestors back on their way to the realm of the spirits.

click on link for more: Chicago is the World » Thinking of peace at the Buddhist Toro Nagashi after the terrorist attack in Norway

Monday, August 8, 2011

AML Thinking of peace at the Buddhist Toro Nagashi after the terrorist attack in Norway - NAM EthnoBlog

Two weeks after the Obon Festival, a Buddhist holiday to remember and celebrate one’s ancestors, during which spirits are said to come home to visit the family for two weeks, comes the Toro Nagashi, a Buddhist ritual to send our visiting ancestors back on their way to the realm of the spirits.

It is a beautiful ceremony, held at sunset at water’s edge, with Japanese American ladies in purple robes chanting, a Buddhist priest saying prayers, younger folks performing taiko drumming and song. Individual paper lanterns are dedicated to family members, lit, then towed out to sea by a small boat.

The ancestors who have been home visiting their families in the world of the living follow the bobbing lanterns down the river and out to sea, which helps them find their way back to the land of the spirits.

One could make a bad joke here that although we all like our relatives to visit, we do not like them to stay too long.

click on link for more: Thinking of peace at the Buddhist Toro Nagashi after the terrorist attack in Norway - NAM EthnoBlog

Sunday, August 7, 2011

AML Thinking of peace at the Buddhist Toro Nagashi after the terrorist attack in Norway

Two weeks after the Obon Festival, a Buddhist holiday to remember and celebrate one’s ancestors, during which spirits are said to come home to visit the family for two weeks, comes the Toro Nagashi, a Buddhist ritual to send our visiting ancestors back on their way to the realm of the spirits.

It is a beautiful ceremony, held at sunset at water’s edge, with Japanese American ladies in purple robes chanting, a Buddhist priest saying prayers, younger folks performing taiko drumming and song. Individual paper lanterns are dedicated to family members, lit, then towed out to sea by a small boat.

The ancestors who have been home visiting their families in the world of the living follow the bobbing lanterns down the river and out to sea, which helps them find their way back to the land of the spirits.

One could make a bad joke here that although we all like our relatives to visit, we do not like them to stay too long.

click here for more: Thinking of peace at the Buddhist Toro Nagashi after the terrorist attack in Norway:

Monday, August 1, 2011

AML Facing the terror of sports culture far outside my comfort zone in Recreational Paddling class - NAM EthnoBlog

When my teenage daughter, Hao Hao, started rowing crew for Huron High School, the president of the crew parents’ group recommended that we parents also get involved by rowing with the Ann Arbor Rowing Club. I thought he was nuts.

click on link for more: Facing the terror of sports culture far outside my comfort zone in Recreational Paddling class - NAM EthnoBlog

Chicago is the World » Facing the terror of sports culture far outside my comfort zone in Recreational Paddling class

When my teenage daughter, Hao Hao, started rowing crew for Huron High School, the president of the crew parents’ group recommended that we parents also get involved by rowing with the Ann Arbor Rowing Club. I thought he was nuts.

Hard enough to take a child to and from five crew practices a week, how was I supposed to find time to add in my own practices as well? Still, the group of parents who also rowed looked pretty cool at 5 a.m., dressed in their own red and black spandex outfits, unloading the boats alongside the kids.

Yet here I am, climbing into an outrigger canoe at 7:15 in the morning.

click on link for more: Chicago is the World » Facing the terror of sports culture far outside my comfort zone in Recreational Paddling class
There was an error in this gadget